Gazing III: Glimpse

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“Begone, skyrat,” the forest-dweller said.  “You are not welcome here.”
Arall was behind us, already walking out of the room, her toes releasing a door handle.  She was muttering, “I keep telling her that, and she’s still here.”  When released, that stone door paused, about to shut us inside, like a trap soon to snap closed.
At least I wouldn’t be trapped here alone; besides that forest-dweller⁠ ⁠—⁠ “her unholiness”⁠ ⁠—⁠ who right now was raining her ire down on me, there was Mawla, slinking around, half unseen.
We’d come to a resident’s room.  And now, not six breaths inside, the plain-dweller wiver was⁠ ⁠—⁠ quietly, stealthily⁠ ⁠—⁠ plopping herself down on the bed.  It was the bed of the forest-dweller.  The bed of the forest-dweller who was still wearing that necklace of bones⁠ ⁠—⁠ the forest-dweller who had no less than seven knives strapped to her side, and had no less menace than poison with scales.  It was the bed of the lady who was known as her unholiness.

Rousing IV: Validate

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“Hi?  Who are you?” I asked the immaculately-dressed plain-dweller.
He clicked his tongue once before replying, giving me a disarming smile, “Oh, me?  I’m nobody.  I might have dropped by the Llygaid Crwydro twice or so, but I am in Gwymr oh so scarcely.  No, you wouldn’t remember me.  And I don’t remember you.  How odd.”
This plain-dweller had stood listlessly in front of the library, looking all around, and checking a pocket ringglass.  Over their breast and forelegs a silky red robes with twisting green filaments flowed.  On the breast of the robes lay some embroidered pickaxes and a pile of ash.  Even for a library patron, they looked well-dressed.
Really, they looked out of place. Their green eyes met mine, and their frills spread out like an invitation.

Sifting VII: Anneal

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Along the roads into Gwymr/Frina the scattered lamp- and sign-posts mixed with bright-colored signs warning of trenches and sudden drops. Little glider-scorpions emerged from the deeper crevices, flitting in the night with the short, sporadic glides that named them.  Often the whirring of bats rose with the calls and buzzes of the scorpions, but when one appeared, the other would grow silent, hiding or hunting.
We passed a few houses dotting the ravine at its widest, where the posts instead fenced off their yards.  Here, netting rose from the fence-posts, and blocked any inward flight.  The nets met big poles rising from the roofs, making the houses like spiderly pyramids.